Bone Broth Hacks/TIPS???

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Hi All,

I am interested in making my own bone broth, but want to know how to go about this in the most efficient manner so I can introduce it into my diet on a regular basis as opposed to enjoying it once every couple of days.  Does anyone know of some good hacks for making bone broth?  I think I am OK with the boil time on chicken but with beef bones it seems like there has to be a better way.

I thought perhaps grinding the bones (or smashing them with a hammer) to a rough powder might work (more surface area exposed to the heat).  Perhaps higher heat for shorter time?  But then I would have to constantly add more water, if it was boiling or close to a boil.

Any tips?  It seems most people just keep a crock pot full of broth constantly simmering on the counter.

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Pressure cooker + slow cooker are the best options right now if you want to make your own. I still like the slow cooker better because it produces a more gelatinous broth (since I can cook it for much longer). Using the pressure cooker, it works better if you use more bones per the amount of water and restart it a few times during the day (so it ends up cooking for maybe 3 hours).

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I keep the carcasses of rotisserie chickens and bones in the freezer. I also keep the outside peels of onions that I would otherwise throw away. When I have 2-3 old chickens and a bag full of onion scraps, I add them to a large stock pot with as much water as my biggest pot will hold. I simmer it (don’t boil), add apple cider vinegar (maybe 2-3 T, this gets the minerals out of the bones) for 12-24 hours or until it tastes good. (I may add more water if alot evaporates. It’s not too scientific).  Cool, strain, then measure by 2-4 cups in gallon plastic zip lock bags. Lay in freezer to freeze flat (then stack later). Sometimes I use the crock pot. It works as well but my stock pot is bigger.  Just try.  You’ll find your way.

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I used to simmer overnight until I got Sally Fallon’s book:  “Nourishing Broth”.  Now, depending on the type of bones, I only boil for 6-8 hrs and always get a nice gel.  I just pour in some apple cider vinegar, I don’t measure.  I too keep bones/scraps in the freezer til I get a stock pot full.  I also use to put in freezer bags until ready to use.  Now, I just put broth in canning jars (with layer of tallow on top) and keep in the fridge until ready to use.  I just finished some that was in the fridge for months and still delish.  Also, I usually will resuse the bones a second time for a second batch of broth.

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The crock pot takes very little preparation time; the real time involved is in the waiting. Once you have it going you just have to wait for it to be ready and then add water as you scoop some out eat time.

Pressure cookers are the faster option. You’ll need to supervise instead of walking away, but you can have a pretty decent broth with about 30 min under pressure. You’ll know that it’s a good one when you stick it in the fridge and it solidifies like Jello!

  • joey
    That is excellent advice, thanks Matt!
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